Notable Graves Archives: Notable

 

 

 

 

John Coalter

 

“This stone is erected in Memory of JOHN COALTER of Chatham.  Of humble origin, he rose to eminence Less by the display of uncommon talents than by moral worth. By an integrity that none ever questioned. A fidelity that evaded no duty. A firmness that defied a like temptation and danger. And a sincerity simplicity and kindness of nature That won the hearts of all who approached him. The records of his country testify the honourable posts which he filled. Of his private virtues all who knew him can speak. But the Depth of his unpretending goodness is known only to God whom he worshipped in the secret of his own heart. While in every act of his life he served him openly. To him who gave it the Spirit has returned. The dust lies here. His children have placed this Stone To record his virtues to his children’s children. He was born in Rockbridge, Virga Aug, 20th 1769 And died at Chatham, near this place Feb. 2nd 1838.”

“Touching this spot lie the Remains of St. George Tucker Coalter, Esq only son of John Coalter, who followed his Father to the grave before this tomb was completed. He died August 19, 1839, Aged 30 years 2 Months and 7 Days. A son worthy of such a father.”

Section -
ID -87



Birth -1769

Death - 1838

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] John Coalter (August 20, 1771 – February 2, 1838) was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia. He was a tutor in the family of Judge St. George Tucker in Williamsburg and studied law at the College of William and Mary in 1789. After graduation he settled in Staunton, Virginia and practiced law there. After being Commonwealth’s Attorney for several years, he was appointed to the General District court for Staunton in 1809. On May 11, 1811, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia. He owned Chatham Manor near Fredericksburg, Virginia.[1] About 1821, he moved to Richmond, Virginia where he lived until his death on February 2, 1838.

Coalter died in Richmond and was buried at Chatham Manor, but his remains were later moved across the Rappahannock River to the cemetery of St. George’s Church in Fredericksburg.His and his last father-in-law’s demise led to legal complications, as his widow Hannah Coalter wanted to free the slaves she inherited, which was not permitted at the time, although was permitted in a will, which she had drafted and redrafted by acclaimed lawyers before she died in 1857.

[2] John COALTER Judge (Va.
Born August 20, 1769 [location unknown]
Son of Michael Coalter and Elizabeth Moore
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of Anne Frances Bland Tucker — married June 5, 1802 [location unknown]
Father of Elizabeth Tucker Coalter
Died February 2, 1838 in Chatham, VA

[3]William and Mary – John Tyler letter to him in 1834
John Tyler, Senate Chamber [Washington, D.C.], to John Coalter, Fredricksburg, Va. Appreciates the honor conferred upon him by the citizens of Fredericksburg which was sent by him [JC]; his motives in the public office have been to uphold the Constitution and the laws and to restrain executive power; those maintaining opposite opinions have been diminished due to “that event which has transpired since many of the elections took place”; regrets inability to meet with them. 2 pp. TCy of ALS.

[4] He attended Liberty Hall Academy (now Washington and Lee University). He became tutor to the children of St. George Tucker and studied law. He returned to Augusta County where he practiced law.  He was appointed sheriff in 1791 and clerk of the District Court in 1793, was appointed judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law in 1809, and a judge of the Court of Appeals in 1811, serving until 1831. Coalter was a member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830. He married first Maria Rind in 1790; second, Margaret Davenport in 1795; third, Anne Frances Bland Tucker June 5,1802; and fourth Hannah Harrison Jones February 14,1822. He had at least three children by his third wife.
Died at Chatham, his estate in Stafford County, Virginia.

[5] Virginia Herald
[6] Judge Coalter was born in Rockbridge County on August 20th, 1771.  He was the son of Michael Coalter and Elizabeth Moore, daughter of James Moore.

He was a tutor in the family of Judge Saint George Tucker in Williamsburg and  studied law in William and Mary College.  In 1789, he took a course under  Chancellor Wythe and Bishop Madison, president of institution.  After completing  his law course he settled near Staunton and practiced law.  He was very much reduced in circumstances and at first used to walk to his courts with clothes  and papers in a bag on his shoulders.

At first he was attorney for the commonwealth and in 1809, he was appointed a  Judge of the General Court.  On May 11, 1811, he was promoted to the Court of  Appeals.  About 1821, he went to Richmond to live and soon after purchased  “Chatham” in Stafford County, (opposite Fredericksburg) on the Kings Highway, Route #37.  Judge Coalter resided at “Chatham” until his death which occurred on  February 2, 1838.

Charles  Augustus Marray, grandson of Lord Dunmore has drawn in his “Travels” 1839 a flattering picture of Judge Coalter in these picturesque surroundings.   In this picture his face denoted frankness, energy and shrewdness.

Judge Coalter married three times (1) Maria Rind, daughter of William Rind of  Williamsburg, Editor of one of the Virginia Gazettes published in that City at  the time of the Revolution.

He married (2) Margaret Davenport of Williamsburg and (3) Frances Bland Tucker daughter of Judge Saint George Tucker.  By his last wife he left issue.

When Washington Irving was here collecting information for his “Life of   Washington” Judge Coalter took him to “Chatham” to dinner.  It was in the spring   and he had for dinner jowl, turnip salad, poached eggs and corn pone, and dried
cherry roll and hard sauce for desert.

In the year 1796, a petition was presented to the General Assembly of Virginia  for permission to build a toll bridge across the Rappahannock river to  Fredericksburg from the lower line of land of “Chatham”.  This was granted and  records indicate that it was a toll bridge and owned by private parties for  nearly a century, and yet when the city purchased the bridge it had been owned by only three people, William Fitzhugh, Judge John Coalter and Charles S. Scott.   The bridge was formerly known as the “Chatham Bridge” but it is now call the  Free Bridge as there is no longer any toll charge.

In 1861, the bridge was destroyed by fire.
In 1889, by a flood.
In 1890, the site was purchased by the City of Fredericksburg and they erected  the present iron bridge which is about 1000 feet long.

Sources -

[1] wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Coalter\
[2] wikitree http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/COaLTER-9
[3] https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/17938
http://scdb.swem.wm.edu/?p=creators/creator&id=472
[4] Findagrave
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8281285
[5] References in Virginia Herald
Married H. Williamson  16 Feb 1822  3×2
Posted Chatham  21 Jan 1824   3×4
‘Green Bottom’ For Sale  3 Aug 1825  3×5
Owner Of Chatham Bridge  20 Dec 1828  3×4
Chatham Bridge Repaired  25 Jun 1828  3×3
Owner Of Chatham Bridge  27 Jun 1829  3×5
Rappahannock Canal President  18 May 1833  3×3
Chatham Bridge Notice  19 Jan 1833  3×4
Political Committeeman  14 May 1834  3×2
U. S. Mine Director   20 Aug 1834  2×5
Bank Director  22 Jan 1834  3×4
Repaired Chatham Bridge  4 Feb 1835  3×3
Railroad Comm.  17 Oct 1835  3×3
Member Agri. Soc.   22 Apr 1835  3×3
Member Vigilance Comm.  23 Sep 1835  3×3
[6] Sue Gordon – http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/fredericksburg/cemeteries/stgeorgesch.txt


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Duffel

 

In Memory of Samuel Leonard Duffel son of Edwd. & Elizabeth Duffel

Section -
ID -82



Birth -1801

Death - 1803

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] Edward was a tailor

[2] “There is a much natural description. Simplicity, filial piety in the following lines.”
“The child who can read them without feeling aglow of affection for his parent has but little sensibility or humanity in his breath.””

[3] Edward Duffel paid $15 business license

Sources -

[1] Virgnia Herald 9 Nov 1802   1×1
Virginia Herald 18 Jun 1802 3×2
[2] Virginia Herald 7 May 1805  3×4
[3] http://resources.umwhisp.org/Fredericksburg/merchants/fburgml1804.htm
List of business licenses  List of licenses granted by Adam Darby, commissioner of the Revenue for the Town of Fredericksburg to merchants and Pedlars to sell merchandise of Foreign Growth or manufacture from 1st May 1804 to the 1st day of September, agreeable to the receipts of Robt Crutchfield, Deputy Sheriff of Spotsylvania County, given for respective sums and to the persons whose names are annexed.


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Seth Barton

 

Here lies an affectionate parent & sincere friend. SETH BARTON  Was born near Warren, Rhode Island July 29 A.D. 1755, and died at his seat near Fredericksburg, December 29 A.D. 1813, Aged 58 years and 5 months.

Section -
ID -81



Birth -1755

Death - 1813

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1]Letter Paula Felder to Vernon Edenfield.

Barton purchased Fielding Lewis estate 1799 and brought 5 children to live them. Originally from RI and served in the Revolution War army and afterwards became a successful shipping merchant in Baltimore. In 1802 tried make grounds as a subdivision, including the mansion itself.

1812 helped develop Liberty town at the intersection of Barton and Liberty Street.

Then a 3rd subdivision intersection Hanover and Kirkland Streets, including  both sides of Hanover Street extended and included the 10 acre tract which became the Brompton estate.

Married Sarah Emerson Maxwell.

Sources -

[1] Clipfile Virginiana Room Rappahannock Regional Library


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

John S. Berry

 

“Entered into this life December 7, 1841 John Scott Berry son of Lawrence M. & Ann Scott Berry Entered into life eternal Sunday morning Sept. 26, 1920  A sinner saved by grace.”  [Error for Lawrence W. Berry, his father; their tombstones are side by side.]

Section -
ID -67



Birth -1841

Death - 1920

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] 9/27/1921- Civil war vet died pneumonia 80th year. Served in Fredericksburg artillery Braxton’s battery. Badly wounded in battle of Fredericksburg.

Transferred to Adjutant General in Richmond and served with Judged William S. Barton. Served 35 years as deputy clerk of the Corporation Court of Fredericksburg under Robert S. Chew (Chew family served as  clerks for 99 years. Born in Scotia Building on Charles Street and later lived with cousin John F. Scott.

Vestryman at Trinity. Funeral there. Grave reserved for Berry many years earlier along side grave of father, mother, brother sister. Probably last burial at St. George’s as all available space used.

Sources -

[1] Virginia Star 9/26/1921 1×3


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

William Smith

 

Here lies the body of William Smith a native of Glocestershire in England Born 25th May 1746 And departed this life October 7, 1802. An honest man is the noblest work of God.

Section -
ID -54



Birth -1746

Death - 1802

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] Dry goods which he is determined to sell at prime cost for cash or country produce

[2] Meeting of the subscribers of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Electing 12 trustees for 3 years. John Chew in there too

[3] Gentleman much respected by his acquaintance

[4] Former postmaster died age 64

[5] Merchant

[6] Church Warden

Sources -

[1] Virginia Herald Sept 8, 1795 3×4

[2] Virginia Herald April 2, 1799 3×2

[3] Virginia Herald 3/5/1802 2×1

[4] Virginia Herald 5 Mar 1802,    2×1

[5] Virginia Herald 27 Mar 1794    3×1

[6] Virginia Herald 2 Apr 1799     3×2


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Goodwin

 

In Memory of Our Mother Ann Maria Goodwin  Born February 18th 1775  Died March 18th 1849.  Her record is on high. [She was neé Smith, daughter of William Smith (1746-1802) and Mary (1750-1822) his  wife.  Mrs. Anna Maria (Smith) Goodwin’s tombstone is adjacent to her parents, and the several other Goodwin tombstones are in the same row.]

Section -
ID -53



Birth -1775

Death - 1849

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] Pres. -Female Charity School  Family links:
Spouse:Thomas Goodwin (1770 – 1836)

Children:
Thomas Goodwin (1800 – 1823)*
John Harwood Goodwin (1806 – 1842)*

As noted above, she was president of the Female Charity School. This school was created by St. George’s in 1802 and supported by citizen contributions. In 1808 Miss Sophia Carter of Berea in Prince William County left $10,000 for the benefit of poor females in Fredericksburg. The Virginia State Legistature incorporated it at that point [2]

The Female Charity School still stands on Caroline Street, at Lewis though the building was sold. In 1860 governesses Elizabeth and Mary Vass oversaw 18 resident girls in 1860. Its male counterpart, located in the 200 block of Hanover Street, had by 1858 run on hard times. Its assets would be transferred to the Female Charity School after the war [2]

The Female Charity School exists to this day and the building still stands at 1119 Caroline Street at the corner of Lewis Street though they no longer occupy it. In 1860 governesses Elizabeth and Mary Vass oversaw 18 resident girls in 1860. Its male counterpart, located in the 200 block of Hanover Street, had by 1858 run on hard times. Its assets would be transferred to the Female Charity School after the war.[3]

Sources -

[1] Virginia Heraald 31 Jan 1835      3×4
[2] https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1297&dat=19100514&id=jsxNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=PooDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6991,2613937&hl=en
[3] https://fredericksburghistory.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/schooling-antebellum-style/


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Goodwin

 

Erected by an afflicted family in memory of THOMAS GOODWIN who was born on the *9th day of October 1770 and died on the *14th day of January 1836.  [* These two days of the month are very indistinct.]

Section -
ID -50



Birth -1770

Death - 1836

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] One of the most respectable merchants and for the last several years, mayor of our corporation. He enjoyed the respect and esteem of the community

[2] May 21 4pm to appoint committee of subscribers of Mary Washington Memorial.  Virginia Herald wrote about Mary Washington Her maternal lessons installed in his mind that love of country, uncompromising integrity, that clear sighted wisdom which were afterwards to be ripened and displayed on so magnificent a theatre. Apparently  they were combatting an effort to put her remains in the Presbyterian Church. Article mentioned in the Commercial Advertiser of New York.

[3] No. 50.  Mr. Thomas Goodwin was Mayor of Fredericksburg from February 12, 1829 to January 16, 1836.  He died at the age of 65.  His
wife and children are resting by his side. Records indicate that Mr. Goodwin also operated a hotel called the Rappahannock House on the east side of Main Street, between George and Hanover Streets.  In later years the name of the hotel was changed to the Shakespeare and was destroyed by fire in 1866-1867.

[4] Thomas Goodwin was the son of Peter Goodwin & Sarah Hawes (Coghill) Goodwin.He was born 9 Oct 1770 at “Oakley”, Caroline Co., Va

[5] He was elected [mayor] in 1829 & died while still in Office. He had been a member of the Fredericksburg council for several decades. “Thomas Goodwin was a merchant, in politics a Whig and in religion, an Episcopalian.” He had a son Arthur (his 4th son & 5th child)who was born in 1801 & died in 1861; Arthur’s wife was Anne Thom of Fredericksburg.

Sources -

[1] Virginia Herald 1/16/1836 3×3 Died

[2] Virginia Herald M. W. Monument committee 5/25/1831 3×2

[3] Sue Gordon

[4] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/goodwin/5503/

[5] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/goodwin/5507/


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Downman

 

Died in infancy

Section -
ID -29



Birth -1857

Death - 1857

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

One of 6 children William Yates and Mary Downman of Idlewild

Sources -

Family tree


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

John Coakley, Jr.

 

Entered into rest JOHN COAKLEY  Born Feb 14, 1805  Died July 2, 1874.

Section -
ID -23



Birth -1805

Death - 1874

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

When he died he was one of the oldest merchants in Fredericksburg selling books as early as 1830, queensware, leather and dry goods.

He was a member of the Vestry in 1839 to 1865 (resigning that year) and then 1869-1874 until his death. He was senior warden in 1865

He was involved in many community activities. He was also VP of the Fredericksburg Bible Society. He was also involved in the Mary Washington Monument Committee and served as a bank director in 1855 as well as member of an insurance company in the same year and superintendent of the Fredericksburg Aqueduct Company at the time of the Civil War.

During the Civil War in 1852 he was one of 19 arrested by the Federals in August and confined in Old Capital Prison until September. Included in that list was Thomas Knox, Thomas Barton, John F. Scott of St. George’s. They were arrested in retaliation for the Confederate imprisonment of seven federals for disloyalty and were confined in prison in Richmond. 6 of the 19 were members of St. George’s which had the most members of any Church from those arrested: 1. Thomas Knox 2. John Coakley 3. Dr. James Cooke 4. John F. Scott 5. Montgomery Slaughter 6. Thomas B. Barton. Two others John Berrey and George H. C. Rowe kept diaries which are valuable. They were sent to Old Capitol Prison in Washington by boat. This prison was neither an Andersonville nor a minimum security facility. Sanitary conditions were no worse than other prisons of the time but the prisoners were bothered by lice and bed-bugs and bad smelling food. Generally the relations were courteous and some of the rules bent such as being able for the 19 to meet together . The diaries note lots of wine drunk and many practical jokes played on each other that allowed them to keep their spirits high. As Rowe notes, he saw John Coakley once “wore a handkerchief pinned around his waist, in short sleeves and slippers, the very picture of a quarrelsome old maid” They even met up with famed spy Belle Boyd.

[1] 7/9/1874. FredNews  Member and vestryman of the Episcopal Church filling other offices of trust the community. His integrity, fidelity and courtesy were uniform.
[2] Virginia Herald 7/9/1874 3x 2 books , queensware business, sale of dry goods
[3] Virginia Herald 4/19/1834  4×5 AD largest and best assorted stock of books that has ever been offered.
Examples of books –
Illustrations of Pulmonary Consumption
Celebrated speeches of Chatham, Burke and Erskine
Autobiography of John Galt
Memoirs of the Court of Charles I
Exposition of Psalm CXIX

Examples of positions held

FredNews
officer Female Charity School    3 Mar 1848    3×1
bank director    18 Jan 1848    2×5
Farmers Bank Director    29 Jan 1850    2×5
Washington Guard in 1860  24 Jul 1860    2×3
member Fredericksburg Aqueduct Co.    11 Jun 1874    3×5

Virginia Herald
Married Elizabeth Thom     26 Nov 1836     3×2
Member Bible Society     1 Jan 1872     3×3
St. George’s Vestryman     8 Apr 1872     3×2
Book Seller 1 May 1830     3×4
M. W. Monument Committee     28 May 1831     3×2
Leather Merchant     10 Apr 1833     3×3
Member Insurance Company     4 Jan 1855     1×4
Member  Medical Academy 9 Jan 1873     3×2

[4] For some time he was a prominent merchant in Fredericksburg and was  Superintendent of the Fredericksburg Aquaduct Company

Sources -

[1] FredNews died aged 69     9 Jul 174     3×4+
[2] Virginia Herald 7/9/1874 3x 2
[3] Virginia Herald  4/19/1834  4×5
[4] http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/fredericksburg/cemeteries/stgeorgesch.txt


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Patton

 

Sacred to the Memory of Anthony Buck Patton Beloved husband of Virginia B. Patton  Died Jan. 22, 1903.

Section -
ID -21a



Birth -1838

Death - 1903

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1]Anthony Patton 1/22/1903. Died of pulmonary disease. Served as member of Braxton’s battery in the Civil war. 62 years old. always a consistent, loyal Christian died member S. George’s. Widow is daughter of John Coakley
1/23/1903. Funeral to be Sat. 3pm

[2]
Name:    Anthony Patton
Titles and Terms:
Event Type:    Census
Event Date:    1900
Event Place:    ED 89 Fredericksburg city Ward Lower, Spotsylvania, Virginia, United States
Birth Date:    Jun 1838
Birthplace:    Virginia
Relationship to Head of Household:    Head
Father’s Birthplace:    Virginia
Mother’s Birthplace:    Virginia
Race:    White
Gender:    Male
Marital Status:    Married
Years Married:    19
Marriage Year (Estimated):    1881
Mother of how many children:
Number of Living Children:
Immigration Year:
Page:    26
Sheet Letter:    A
Family Number:    542
Reference ID:    35
GS Film number:    1241734
Digital Folder Number:    004117940
Image Number:    00197
Household    Gender    Age    Birthplace
Head     Anthony Patton     M    62    Virginia
Wife     Virginia B Patton
F    48    Virginia

[3]
Son of Dr William Farley Patton and Harriet S. Buck; brother of William Farley Patton, Jr, who died in infancy in 1836.
Married Virginia B. Coakley.
Postwar, having returned to Fredericksburg, he was a merchant living at 407 Hanover Street.
Braxton’s Company, Fredericksburg Virginia Light Artillery, M. Johnson’s Brigade, Artillery, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A.

Residence Fredericksburg, Va.; 5′ 7″.
Enlisted on 3/8/1862 as a Private, he mustered into VA Fredericksburg Light Artillery.
Absent, sick 3/1862.
He was discharged from combat duty due to disability, chronic rheumatism, on 11/26/1862.
Serving in the 3rd Departmental Local Defense Troops, he was detailed 6/1863 Richmond, VA. as a clerk in Medical Director’s Office.

The 3rd Infantry Regiment Local Defense Troops was organized in September, 1864, from the 3rd (Departmental) Infantry Battalion Local Defense Troops. Its members were from the War Department, Post Office Department, Treasury Department, Quartermaster Department, Medical Purveyor’s Department, and men under the age of eighteen.
[4] City Weigher

Sources -

[1] Virginia Star 22 Jan 1903 3×1
[2] https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMJJ-NM5
[3] find a grave
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9729016
[4] Virginia Star 6/1/1895 3×2


Notes - N/A;

 

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