Graveyard Section Archives: Section 1

 

 

 

 

Unknown

 

Unknown – rock marker

Section -
ID -01


Birth- Unknown

Death- Unknown

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data - N/A;

Sources - N/A;

Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

James Duncanson

 

“Here lies The Body of James Duncanson. He was born in Scotland the 11th February 1735. Arrived in Virginia in July 1752. Died the 4th March 1791. ‘Weed his Grave clean ye Men of Goodness For he was your Brother.'”

Section -
ID -15



Birth -1735

Death - 1791

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] Col. James Duncanson came to VA from Forres, Moray, Scotland in the 1750’s. He emigrated to Fredericksburg to go into business with his brother, Robert.

[3]In 1756 he joined the Virginia Militia and served until 1761 under Washington. In 1758, he participated in the Forbes expedition to Fort Duqesne (Pittsburgh). He is our only French and Indian War veteran.

[1]James served in the Masonic Lodge and was treasurer from 1767-1771.

James married Mary “Molly” McAuley. James and Mary’s surviving children were, 1. James, Polly, Ann, Finella who married Charles Urquhart

He purchased several town parcels from 1762-1773 with one purchase in 1780 – Lot No. 29, life interest of sd. Ann Finnie in Lot 22, Lot No. 30, Lots 133 and 134, Lots 91 and 92, Lot 13, Lot 60, Lot 119, and finally Lot 21 in 1780.

[2] James Duncanson served in the Committees of Correspondence in 1774. “There was a great assemblage of citizens in the town house on Wednesday, June I, 1774, when Fielding Lewis, Charles Dick, Charles Mortimer, James Mercer, Charles Washington, William Woodford, James Duncanson, William Porter, George Thornton and Charles Yates were appointed a committee “to correspond with the neighboring towns and counties for the purpose of communicating to each other, in the most speedy manner their sentiments on this present interesting and alarming situation in America.” This was in sympathy to the citizens of Boston suffering from the Intolerable Acts. He participated in the Revolution, and was one of the wealthiest men in this part of Virginia.

Sources -

[1] Web page http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:James_Duncanson_(1)

[2] Web page http://www.librarypoint.org/fredericksburg_in_revolutionary_days_part_i

[3] Web page
http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:James_Duncanson_%282%29

[4] Virginia Herald 5/12/1791 Blair & Urquhart Settling Estate 12 May 1791


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Duncanson

 

Here lies The Body of Mary the beloved Wife of James Duncanson. She was born the 3d Feb. 1748. Died the 10th October 1790.

Section -
ID -14



Birth -1748

Death - 1790

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data - N/A;

Sources - N/A;

Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

William Paul

 

WILLIAM PAUL 1774.
[The stone is enclosed in a granite stone on the back of which is inscribed:] Restored 23 September 1930 by Admirers of John Paul Jones Commodore U. S. N. By whom This stone was first set in place in memory of William his older Brother.

Section -
ID -13



Birth -1735

Death - 1774

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

[1] William Paul was a son of a Scotch gardener on the estate of Lord Selkirk at Kircudlright, Scotland, and brother of John Paul Jones.  William Paul conducted a tailor shop in Fredericksburg.

Filed with the Executive Archives of the State of Virginia is an interesting letter from Judge Francis T. Brooke to General Lambert in which he mentions that William Paul was a Scotch tailor, and that he made clothes for him.  He also states that when William Paul died he saw John Paul Jones in the tailor shop when he went to get his clothes.  At the time he did not know that he was Paul Jones, but later on knew that it was him from his pictures.

William Paul made his will in 1772, leaving all of his property to his sister, Mary Young, and her two oldest children in Abigland, in the Parish of Kirkbeen, in Stewarty of Galloway, North Briton, and their heirs forever.  He died in 1773, and his executors, (as appointed by him) William Templeman and Isaac Heslop declined to serve, and it was not until November, 1774, that anything was done about the estate.  It is assumed that John Paul Jones arrived here then.

Records indicate that William Paul only owned property within the town of Fredericksburg.

[3] DURING THE DECADE in which John Paul Jones was making a career for himself at sea, his brother William prospered sufficiently to purchase from Thomas Blanton, a carpenter, a house and lot in Fredericksburg in June 1770. It stood on a substantial parcel at the corner of Caroline Street and Lafayette Boulevard (then called Prussia Street), with a lot frontage of approximately 90 feet. There, William lived and worked until his death.

The last four years of his life were trouble-ridden. He was in court more than once, presumably suing clients. About the time he acquired the house, he also acquired a wife, Fanny, and a stormy marriage it was.

In September, she departed from their new home, and he took an ad in the Virginia Gazette–published in Williamsburg and distributed throughout the colony–“forewarning all persons from trusting her and from harbouring or concealing her if they would avoid being prosecuted.”

Fanny, however, responded in October in the Gazette with a declaration, co-signed by 10 leading merchants in the town, that she had run up no debts. “Neither am I concealed,” she wrote, “but appear as usual, and I am resolved to recover what is legally due from William Paul.”

Then in November, William Paul filed a complaint against Edward Davis, his indentured servant, who had run away and been captured. (The court added another five years to his servitude.)

In the spring of 1772, William Paul evidently fell gravely ill. He executed a will assigning his estate to his sister in Scotland. He named two men associated with the Whitehaven community as his executors and had proper witnesses. He recovered, however, and the will was not filed.

The precise date and circumstances of William Paul’s death at the end of 1774 are not known, for there was some disarray in the official recording of his will.

Both executors now refused to serve. One of them was ordered to make an inventory, but this was never done, and neither would put up the required bond to be responsible for the modest estate.

Finally, after John Waller, the clerk of the court, committed to putting up the bond himself, Charles Yates stepped forward to accept the responsibility, perhaps as a compassionate gesture.

[2] There also lie interred in the burial ground of St. George’s church, with an unpretentious stone marking the place, the remains of William Paul, a merchant of the town and a native of Scotland, who died here in 1773. In 1770 he purchased from Thomas and Jane Blanton, “for one hundred and twenty pounds, an acre or one- half of the lot or land lying and, being in the town of Fredericksburg, and designated in the plot of said town by the number or figures 258, the same being one-half, or south end of said lot, and purchased by the said Thomas Blanton of Roger Dixon, Gent, and bound on the main street, called Caroline street, and the cross street, called Prussia, together with all houses, buildings, gardens, ways, profits, hereditraments and appurtenances whatever.” This lot is designated on the map of the town to-day as 258, and the house in which Wm. Paul conducted his mercantile business is the one occupied and owned at present by Matthew J. Gately.

Notwithstanding his biographers to the contrary, Wm. Paul made a will in 1772, in which he appointed his friends, Wm. Templeman and Isaac Heslop, his executors, which was witnessed by John Atkinson, Thomas Holmes and B. Johnston. The executors declined to serve and the estate remained until late in the next year without any one being legally authorized to take charge of it. In November, 1774, John Atkinson qualified, it is supposed at the instance of John Paul, who had arrived here to wind up the estate, with John Waller, Jr., as surety, who was afterwards released and Charles Yates became his surety.

This Wm. Paul was the brother of John Paul, who afterwards became the famous John Paul Jones. It has been asserted that Wm. Paul changed his name to Jones to inherit a plantation from Wm. Jones, either in Virginia or North Carolina. But this is shown to be a mistake from the fact that Wm. Paul, in 1770, bought property here as Wm. Paul, made his will in 1772 and signed it Wm. Paul, and died in 1773 and his tomb stone now bears on it the name of Wm. Paul. It was further asserted that in the agreement by which the plantation was to become the property of Wm. Paul, if Wm. Paul died without issue, the property was to go to John Paul on the condition that he would add Jones to his name, and that William did die without issue and the estate of William went to John. This is also a mistake. William did not die intestate, but made a will and gave his entire estate to his sister, Mary Young, and her two oldest children.

One clause of the will reads as follows : “It is my will and desire that my lots and houses in this town shall be sold and converted into money for as much as they will bring, that with all my other estate being sold, and what of my outstanding debts that can be collected, I give and bequeath to my beloved sister, Mary Young, and her two oldest children in Abigland, in the parish of Kirkbean, in Stewarty of Galloway, North Briton, and their heirs forever.” It is not believed that Wm. Paul owned any property out of town from the fact that the bond of his administrator was only five hundred pounds, which was generally double the amount of the estate. His estate in town consisted of his houses and lots, his merchandise and accounts due him, which must have been worth twelve or fifteen hundred dollars. Therefore the bond of $2,500 was sufficient only for his possessions in town, and no other is alluded to or mentioned in his will. It has been held that he owned property in the county of Spotsylvania, but that arises from the fact there were others by the name of Paul in the county who had property. But this William Paul is traced by the reference in his will to the parish of Kirkbean, Galloway, where his sister, Mary Young, and brother John lived.

“Why John Paul changed his name to Jones was probably known only to himself. Many writers have undertaken to explain it, but without success, and the mystery is yet unsolved. In 1775 John Paul Jones’s name heads a list of naval lieutenants, and, because of his meritorious services, he was soon appointed a captain, and finally rose to the rank of commodore. His daring exploits and unequal, but successful, contests soon won for him the thanks of the American Congress, as well as the gratitude of the American people, while it carried terror and dismay to the enemies of his country. He greatly humiliated England by landing his fleet on her shores during the Revolutionary war, a thing that had not been done before for centuries, if ever, since it was a nation.

At the close of the war, in which he had covered himself with glory, he was offered an important command by the Empress of Russia against the Turks in the Black sea, which he accepted with the stipulation “that he was never to renounce the title of an American citizen.” He died in Paris in 1792, and was buried in that city, aged forty-five years. General Washington, then President of the United States, had just commissioned him for an important duty, but he died before the commission reached him. As the many years rolled on, rounding up a century, his body laid in an unknown grave, notwithstanding many efforts were made to locate it. In 1900 a body was found believed to be his, and there was great rejoicing in this country over the announcement, but, when carefully examined, it was found to be the remains of another and not those of the great American commodore. But this did not discourage those who had the matter in hand, and the search continued under the direction of Gen. Horace Porter, the American Ambassador to the Court of France, under great difficulties. On the 7th of April, 1905, the body was found in a cemetery known as Saint Louis, which was laid out in 1720 for a burial place for Protestants, but which had been closed more than half a century, and buildings were constructed upon it at the time of the discovery of the body. The remains were declared to be those of John Paul Jones, after every test had been applied that could be, and they were accepted by our government as those of the great naval hero. Some time was spent in preparing to remove the remains to this country, but early in 1906 they were placed upon a United States man of war, escorted by vessels from England and France, and were landed at Annapolis, where they were reinterred in the presence of thousands of people from all parts of the country, with booming of cannon and every honor a grateful people could bestow upon him.

Sources -

[1[] http://archive.org/stream/intidewatervirgi00jett/intidewatervirgi00jett_djvu.txt
“In Tidewater Virginia”. Also http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/fredericksburg/cemeteries/stgeorgesch.txt
[2] Quinn’s history Fredericksburg
[3] Paula Felder  http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2005/062005/06252005/109430


Notes -

1735 is an estimated birth date
http://www.jpj.demon.co.uk/jpjgeneal.htm#William%20Paul

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Young

 

In memory of Elizabeth Young wife of James Young. Born 22nd November 1778.Died 10th July 1806.”Weep not dear friends tho I am no more  When God thus calls its not amiss. He bade me come. I go before to meet you in eternal bliss.”

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ID -12



Birth -1778

Death - 1806

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

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[1] 23rd year of life. Amiable and worthy consort of James Young, Esq 

Mr. James Young was the second proprietor of the Indian Queen Hotel.  This hotel was on the south corner of Main or Caroline Street, and Charlotte Street.  The site is now occupied and owned by Dr. F.T. Cassidy.  Dr. Cassidy conducts a drug store.

Historians state that the Indian Queen Hotel was a large Colonial building with a colonnade porch the entire length of the edifice.  The hotel property embraced a large lot at the back which was used as a stage yard and the stables were located where the Southern Foundry now stands.

John Randolph of Roanoke on one occasion stopped here.  The Democrats were much enthused when they heard of Mr. Randolph’s arrival and congregated to entertain him.  They prepared delicious punch in an adjoining room and then invited Mr. Randolph in to meet the guest and partake of the drink.  In a gruff voice he replied to the committee that waited on him, I don’t drink with strangers and if I can’t rest here one night without being disturbed by a mob I will drive to the Sycamores.  The Sycamores was a hotel twelve miles from town on the Bowling Green road, or Old Stage road between Richmond and Washington, and now known as Route #2.

Tradition has it that it was in the Indian Queen Hotel that the statute of religious liberty was considered, adopted and written.  The Committee composed of Thomas Jefferson, George Wythe, Archibald Cary, George Mason and Ludwell Lee.

[2] On the left of the gate about three feet as you enter the graveyard flat white stone marks the grave of Elizabeth Young,  wife of James Young, Proprietor of the old, historic Indian Queen Hotel. 

Sources -

[1] Virginia Herald 7/11/1806. 3×2
[2] Sue Gordon http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/fredericksburg/cemeteries/stgeorgesch.txt


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Ann Chew

 

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF ANN CHEW  Relict of Capt. John Chew who died Oct. 7th 1821 in the 67th year of her age.  Few Females were more eminantly [sic] distinguished for correctness of deportment and…practice of all christian virtues. [She] was Conjugal as a widow, exemplary as a [M]other fond and affectionate

Section -
ID -11



Birth -1754

Death - 1821

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

Husband was John Chew

[1] John served in the militia as lieutenant under Capt. John  Holliday 1780. Lost arm in battle of Camden and was taken prisoner. 1789 on invalid pension role of Va. 1814–that record among those destroyed in War Dept.

John Chew, Esquire was appointed clerk of the Fredericksburg Hustings Court on August 6, 1767, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the first clerk of that Court, Henry Armistead, who died in August, 1787.

The Chew family held the clerkship of the Hustings Court, except for a short time it was held by W.C. Strait, under military appointment, covering a period of ninety-nine years and eleven days.

Sources -

[1]  Lineage Book – National Society of the Daughters of the American …, Volume 27
By Daughters of the American Revolution


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Duffel

 

In Memory of Samuel, son of James & Rebecca Duffel who died 20th August 1806 aged 3 Months.”

Section -
ID -10



Birth -1806

Death - 1806

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

Son of James and Rebecca Duffel, aged 3 months. Not sure if this is 1800 or 1806. Worn off

James is buried in Lynchburg  Silversmith; Revolutionary War Soldier. [1]
There are several references 1802-1806 and then VH Aug 4, 1807 reported as moving[2]

He was born in 1761 in Bucks Co, PA and died 1835 Lynchburg [3]

Where Duffel learned his trade we do not know; it may have been in Alexandria, for he enlisted in the Revolutionary army from that city. According to Gwathmey, he was a corporal in the 5th and 11th Virginia Regiments of the Continental Line. He is listed in the 1790 census as a resident of Prince George’s Parish, Georgetown District, South Carolina.

The New York Directory for 1801 contains his name with the information that he was to be found at 349 Pearl Street. His eldest child and only son died in New York in 1802, aged six years. Later that same year he moved to Fredericksburg, Va., where his brother, Edward, a merchant, had preceded him.

On October 28, of that year, he thanked the people of Fredericksburg for the encouragement they had given him, and announced that he had moved three doors above his former residence, to a tenement of Capt. Mercer’s.

In February 1804 he announced that a Negro girl had come to his shop and, under pretense of being sent by a neighboring lady, obtained four pairs of earrings, a breast pin, and a finger ring. He asked that these be stopped if offered for sale.

He continued to advertise watches, silver, plated ware, jewelry, and guns, until on August 4, 1807 he gave notice that he intended moving from Fredericksburg about the middle of the following month, and offered his stock for sale. Whether he moved at this time or not has not been determined, but his youngest daughter, Elizabeth, was born in Fredericksburg on October 19, 1809. His brother, Edward, had gone to Lynchburg, and here James followed him. The wives of these two brothers were sisters.

In 1810 he bought Lot 13 in Lynchburg and in 1811, Lot 6, as well as some additional land in the city. He was member of the Lynchburg City Council and in 1814 a director of the Exchange Bank of Virginia. In November 1817, he advertised that he intended to quit his present business and offered his stock for sale and the house in which he lived for rent. Jewelry, silver and plated ware, watches, spectacles, rifles and shotguns, pistols, swords, epaulettes, whips and canes were for sale at greatly reduced prices until all was sold. On December 3, 1827, he bought a piece of land from William Galt’s executors, to which he added more frontage in 1828. [3]

[4] paid $15 license

Sources -

[1] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Duffel&GSiman=1&GSst=48&GRid=34051806&
[2] Virginia Herald  29 Jun 1802.1×1  ;  7 DEC 1804  3×3  ;
[3] http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~silversmiths/makers/silversmiths/79719.htm
[4] http://resources.umwhisp.org/Fredericksburg/merchants/fburgml1804.htm


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Mary Thom

 

Mary Thom Died June 17, 1894  Numbered with Thy Saints in Glory Everlasting.

Section -
ID -09



Birth -1814

Death - 1894

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

Died at residence of nephew Anthony Patton, 407 8th Street. 74 years old. Last survivor of 18 brothers and sisters. Reuben Thoms postmaster for 30 years. Interred beside mother, father and other relatives[1]

Sources -

[1]. Free Lance  19 Jun 1894


Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Thom

 

Catherine Thom  Died Jan. 27, 1886.  [The Historical Sketch of 1892 gives the age of Miss Catherine Thom as 70 years when she died in 1886.]

Section -
ID -08



Birth -1816

Death - 1868

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRQ7-VZQ
Census says she was born in 1826. Daughter of Reuben Thom but no references in newspapers

Sources - N/A;

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Eleanor Thom

 

ELEANOR REAT wife of R. T. Thom  Died Nov. 20th 1865  Aged 79 years & 4 Months.  [These two inscriptions on one monument.]

Section -
ID -07B



Birth -1786

Death - 1865

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data - N/A;

Sources - N/A;

Notes - N/A;

 

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