centuries Archives: 18th Century

 

 

 

 

John Dandridge

 

Here lied interred the Body of Colonel John Dandridge of New Kent County who departed this life the 31st day of August 1756, Aged 56 years.

Section -
ID -114



Birth -1700

Death - 1756

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

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[1] Colonel John Dandridge, father-in-law for George Washington was a brother of Colonel William Dandridge of the Council, was born in 1700 and came to Virginia about 1722. He had grant of a water front lot in Hampton, Elizabeth City County. His children were all born there. He served as County Clerk, which is those days (Colonial days) was considered a very lucrative position.

Colonel Dandridge married Frances Jones, daughter of Orlando Jones on July 22, 1730. He was the father of Martha Dandridge who married first Daniel Parks Custis, second George Washington. He died on August 31, 1756, aged 56 years. Historians do not seem to know why he died in Fredericksburg. Some state that he was here visiting his daughter, Martha who married General Washington, but that cannot be true because he died more than two years before his daughter was married. I have also read that he was here attending races at “Chatham”, held by William Fitzhugh.

In Saint George’s graveyard, near the northeast corner of the church Colonel Dandridge is buried.  His grave is marked by a flat stone, about four feet from the church, and with the following inscription:

No. 5.  Here lies the body of Colonel John Dandridge, Of New Kent County, who departed this life the 31st day of August, 1756, aged 56 years.

In Washington’s diaries, June 28 1788, he wrote that Mary Washington had “perceived that the Tomb of her Father, the late John Dandridge, Esq to be much out of sorts.”

Below is a letter written by George Washington to Charles Carter of Fredericksburg:

Dear Sir:

When Mrs. Washington was at the Church of Fredericksburg she perceived the Tomb of her father, the late John Dandridge Esquire, in a ruinous condition, and being desirous of having it done up again.  Will you permit me, my dear Sir, to request the favor of you to engage a workman to do this.  The cost I will remit so soon as it is known, and you shall inform me of the execution.

I would thank you for ascertaining the price before hand, having from disinclination to dispute accounts, felt, in too many instances, the expansion, of Tradesman’s consciences when no previous agreement has been made.

My best wishes in which Mrs. Washington joins me, are tendered to Mrs. Carter.  With much truth,

I am Dear Sir,

Your Most Obedience and Affectionate,
Honorable Servant,
George Washington

[2] In the burial ground of St. George’s church, near the northeast corner of the building, lies buried the father of Martha Washington, which fact has only some years since been brought to light, or if it had been before known, it was by the citizens of the past generation of the town. The reason it was unknown to the present generation is accounted for from the fact that the slab over the grave has been covered with dirt for more than half a century, most likely from the erection of the present church building, and was discovered only a few years ago. When the grave was discovered the slab covering it was cleaned off, and the inscription on it was found to read as follows :

“Here lies the body of Col. John Dandridge, of New Kent county, who departed this life the 31st day of August, 1756, aged 56 years.”

How he came to be buried in Fredericksburg is not positively known. It has been claimed by some persons that he was here on a visit to his daughter Martha, who married Gen. Washington, and the weather was so hot that his body could not be taken back to New Kent county, but that cannot be true because he was buried here more than two years before his daughter married Washington.

The most satisfactory explanation of Col. Dandridge’s presence in Fredericksburg, that we have heard given, is that he was attending the celebrated races at Chatham, held by Wm. Fitzhugh which drew to the town people from all sections of the country. But be that as it may, this Col. Dandridge is beyond doubt the father of Martha Washington, unless there were two gentlemen by that name and bearing the same appellation residing in New Kent county at that time, which is not probable.

[3] One account of his death was that he had come to Fredericksburg to visit his niece, Mary, daughter of Captain William Dandridge, and wife of Col. John Spottswood (who was on the St. George’s vestry). He was in their home when he had an attack of apoplexy and died in a short time. He was, of necessity, buried promptly.

Col. Dandridge was buried in Fredericksburg, rather than take the body 90 miles to his home, perhaps because of the oppressive summer heat and there was no way to preserve the body over the days it would have taken to return to New Kent County.

Sources -

[1] Sue Gordon
[2] Quinn’s History of Fredericksburg
[3] Death source: Old New Kent County [Virginia]: Some Account of the Planters, Plantations, and Places, Vol. 1, by Malcolm Harris, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2006


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Catherine Maury

 

[Here lies] the Body of Catharine [Maury the] wife of James Maury [who died in] Liverpool on the 22nd of May 1794 [in] the 39th year of her age.[While] living it was her Purpose [to be] returned…among her own people. While dying she desired that these remains should rest here. She was of the best of Women. [A large corner of the stone is broken and missing.]

Section -
ID -101



Birth -1755

Death - 1794

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

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[1] James Maury (3 Feb 1746 – 23 Feb 1840) was one of the first United States diplomats and one of the first American consuls appointed overseas. In 1790 he was appointed to the Consulate of the United States in Liverpool,[1] one of the first overseas consulates founded by the then fledgling United States of America. Maury held the position of consul for 39 years until he was removed from office by President Andrew Jackson in 1829.] James Maury was born on February 1746 in Albemarle County, Virginia.[3] He was the son of The Reverend James Maury (1719-1769), an educator and Anglican cleric in the American colonies, of Huguenot ancestry. Among The Reverend Maury’s notable pupils were Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, the First Bishop of Virginia.

Maury born in Albermarle moved to Fredericksburg 1770 and formed partnership with James Duncanson. When war came on moved to shipping. He served as commercial agent for Thomas Nelson

Maury was married twice, firstly to Catherine Armistead, and secondly to Margaret Rutson. He and Rutson had five children: James Sifrein Maury (1797–1864); William Maury (1799-–1849); Matthew Maury (1800-–1877); Ann Maury (1803–-1876); Rutson Maury (1805-–1882).Ann Maury conducted considerable research on her family history and published a substantial genealogical chart of the Maury family, which can be still be obtained from The Fontaine Maury Society library.
[2] Born in Liverpool, England on 1755 to Robert Armistead and Private Westwood. Catherine married James Maury and had a child. She passed away on Mar 1795 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, USA.
[3] He honored her plea to be “buried among her own people.” She was daughter of Robert Armistead of Elk Creek Louisa. In 1786 moved to Liverpool- most frequent port used by Rappahannock river merchants. He was a commission merchant he received consignments of tobacco and assembled and shipped good ordered. His friend Jefferson in 1790 gave him position of consul, unpaid. Any unconsigned ships were under his authority.

Sources -

[1] Wikipedia – James Maury -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Maury_%28consul%29
[2] http://records.ancestry.com/Catherine_Armistead_records.ashx?pid=10992341
[3] http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19941029&id=JgMzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=uQcGAAAAIBAJ&pg=3080,5889565.


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Archibald McPherson

 

Here lyes the body of ARCHIBALD MCPHERSON born in the County of Murray in North Britain, who died August the 17, 1754 Aged 49 years.  He was judicious, a lover of learning, openhearted May 1831  Aged 23 years leaving a character distinguished for all the virtues which exalt and adorn her so.  She was the only surviving child of Tayloe and Anna Braxton of Richmond, Va.  Both of whom died at an early age leaving in charge of their friends this pledge of their affection and when this dear object of *** and fond devotion had just attained the endearing affection of parent the blighting hand of death made her husband a widower and her infant an orphan.
[*** undecipherable.]

Section -
ID -06



Birth -1705

Death - 1754

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

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Archibald McPherson was born in 1715 in the Northern part of England.  He came to this country in early manhood and settled in Spotsylvania county.  He was a gentleman of education, refinement and wealth, and a friend to the poor and needy.

Mr. McPherson created a fund in 1795 for the benefit of the Episcopal Charity School of Fredericksburg.  This fund was to be held in trust by the Mayor and Common Council of the town.  Afterwards by an act of the Legislature six
trustees were appointed annually.  The school was kept in the building on the north side of Hanover street just below the Masonic Hall.  This building is now used as a storage room for a merchant of Fredericksburg.  Tradition has it that George Washington visited this school and talked to the children on one of his visits here.

In the back of this quaint little building there is a tablet of marble let into the wall with the following inscription:

“In memory of Mr. Archibald McPherson.  He bequeathed his property to the trustees for the education of the poor.  By an act of the Legislature the funds were transferred to this institution as best fulfilling the Testator’s
charitable design.  Died A.D. 1754, age 49.” [1]

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Archibald McPherson was born in 1715 in the northern part of England. He came to this country in early manhood and settled in Spotsylvania county. He is represented as being a gentleman of education, refinement and wealth, and a friend to the poor and needy. He died in the prime of manhood, leaving to the world an unsullied name and to the poor of the town a legacy to be expended in the education of their children, which is elsewhere mentioned in these pages.

Mr. McPherson was interred in the burial ground of St. George’s church and a marble slab erected over his grave, which is now secured to the wall of the Mission House, at the west end of the lot on Princess Ann street. On that slab is the following inscription:

“Here lies the body of Archibald MePherson, born in the county of Murray, in North Britain, who died August 17, 1754, aged 49 years. He was judicious, a lover of learning, open hearted, generous and sincere. Devout, without ostentation; disdaining to cringe to vice in any station. Friend to good men, an affectionate husband.

A heap of dust alone remains of thee,
‘Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be.
“Elizabeth, his disconsolate widow, as a testimony of their mutual affection, erected this  monument to his memory.” [2]

Mr. McPherson was a member of Saint George’s Church, and is buried in Saint George’s Graveyard.  A marble slab was erected over his grave.  This is now fastened to the wall of the Parish House, at the west end of the lot on Princess
Anne street.  [1]

Sources -

[1] Sue Gordon  http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/fredericksburg/cemeteries/stgeorgesch.txt
[2] Quinn http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Fredericksburg,_Virginia_1608-1908/16


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Winefrid Ritchardson

 

Here lies the body of Winefrid the wife of Daniel  Ritchardson who died Octr: the 16th: 1763, aged 23 years.  Also 3 children lies Enterrd by Her.  Remember man as you pass by  So you are now so once was I  So as I am so must you be. Therefore prepare to follow me.

Section -
ID -03



Birth -1740

Death - 1763

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

Data -

No information found

Sources - N/A;

Notes - N/A;

 

 

 

 

 

John Jones

 

Section -
ID -02


Birth- Unknown

Death - 1752

Age -

Gender -

Profession- Unknown

Veteran- N/A

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Jones owned a tavern in what was called the “upper neighborhood”

“It was in the upper end of the town that an assembly of Scotsmen congregated and socialized at the neighborhood tavern of John Jones, who has the oldest surviving headstone (1752) in St. George’s Cemetery.    Some were managers of Glasgow franchises. Some were political refugees from the conflict with England. Hugh Mercer (who came a bit later) and John Sutherland were doctors.

“By now, Col. Lewis’ store was established just outside the town line. Young Fielding Lewis and his bride Catharine Washington, a cousin to all the local Washingtons, were in a home of their own nearby. Married in 1746, his wife did not survive the birth of their third child. She died in February 1750, and in May, Fielding married his cousin Betty Washington.”[1]

Jones could accommodate several lodgers. Source – estate inventory – six tables, 14 pewter dishes, wine glasses, china cups seven silver teaspoons . Widow Barbara continued the tavern after his death. At one time in 1753 she was reimbursed by the Masons for 13 broken glasses. Some time after she died, building occupied by Hugh Mercer for apothecary; his widow continued to lease. [2]

Jones’ tavern was at the intersection of Amelia and Caroline Streets. The block was destroyed in fire 1807. 

Jones son-in- law Charles Julian  opened a tavern in 1759 that became the meeting place of the masons until they met at the Town House. Julian’s widow operated a coffee shop there.  It was the site of a luncheon in 1784 to which council and resident and residents escorted George Washington from his mother’s house.

Sources -

1 Paula Felder – 
http://www.ggcweb.com/nnht/pages.asp?pg=Fred
2. Early Taverns Livened up Fredericksburg 12/4/1999.
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19991204&id=PzIzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=jQgGAAAAIBAJ&pg=2209,1211872&hl=en


Notes - N/A;

 

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